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Dalton in Furness 17th November

Note from the ICC and Cumbria CVS

We are hosting a day at the Drill Hall in Dalton-in-Furness, from 10-4pm on November 17th, to try and ensure our local community is as well as possible over Winter, which, whilst being beautiful and crisp up here in Cumbria, we also know causes difficulties for many people. We want everyone to LOVE Winter this year! We asked around and we have identified 6 domains that people struggle with over Winter and we would like to know if you would be able to contribute to any of these domains. We will be setting out the Drill hall in 6 sections each section devoted to one of the domains and if you would like to attend, know of someone who would benefit by knowing or wish to contribute literature or a display please let us know. Or indeed have any other ideas.

The Domains are as follows:

1)      Winter Wobbles: getting out, about and around in Winter, how to maintain activity levels in reduced daylight & poor weather, how to get around to where you need to during the winter months.

2)      Winter Blues: how to reduce isolation, keep connected, prevent loneliness and poor mood when the nights draw in

3)      Winter Bugs: how to stave off or manage the inevitable winter sniffles, best advice on preventing a minor ailment becoming a major illness

4)      Winter Weather: what support is out there to ensure the winter weather doesn’t wreak havoc, slips, falls, floods, frost, home safety, ensuring enough food is in the house if you can’t go out

5)      Winter Warmth: being cold makes many illnesses worse so how can you ensure you stay warm and toasty in and out of the house

6)      Winter Wellbeing: If you already have a long term condition, what advice or support do you need to prevent it worsening over Winter

We would love as much support as possible for this very community led event. We know there are so many resources out there, so many people doing great things, but do the right people know about it? We are hoping that both the work leading up to this event & the event itself will go a long way to connecting people, communities and resources.

In  addition the Furness Urgent Care Network which is a formal NHS body consisting of senior leaders in Acute & Urgent Care eg hospital managers, A&E consultants, Chief Nurses, Adult Social Care teams and Community Nursing teams will be holding their monthly meeting at the Drill hall in the morning so there is an opportunity for those people to see what support there is for the NHS from all the amazing work in the community & vice versa.

Please start talking about how we can shape this event, get back to us with ideas, contributions or criticisms so we can ensure that the event really showcases the community assets to give us the best Winter ever!

Looking forward to hearing from you

Dr Arabella Onslow

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The Canterbury tales: lessons on how accountable care systems should work

This report, from The King’s Fund – Developing accountable care systems: lessons from Canterbury, New Zealand, found that there’s a lot that the NHS can learn from the Canterbury region on how accountable care should work – and how it should not.

Web link: https://www.kingsfund.org.uk/events/canterbury-tales

Charity power

Larger charities must ‘give up some power’, says Shelter head Polly Neate, chief executive of the housing and homelessness charity, tells an NPC conference that the charity sector has to ask itself some difficult questions about the balance of power

Polly Neate, chief executive of the housing and homelessness charity Shelter, has called on larger charities to give up some of the power they hold in order to help the sector regain public trust.

Speaking at the annual conference of the think tank NPC in London yesterday, Neate said that in order for the sector to get off the back foot it had to face difficult questions about power and the privileged positions enjoyed by some charities.

She said that although the sector had power it was concentrated in the hands of a few organisations. This power was consolidated by large charities in the way they used their brands, which Neate said was “the enemy of partnerships and the enemy of sharing power”. She said: “It stops civil society, or the idea of charity, from having a brand, by which I mean from having a clearly recognised identity and a set of understood values.” Neate made some implicit criticism of schemes such as the Understanding Charities Group, which was developed by a group of charities with the aim of improving public trust in charities, although she did not name any particular initiative or organisation.

“I do not think that people are losing trust in charities because they do not understand how charities work,” she said. “I think the sector does have some comms problems, but that is a symptom not a cause.” She criticised the significant sums spent by some charities that helped them consolidate their own positions but resulted in minor policy changes for beneficiaries. What we are getting at the moment is quick wins from reasonably big charities that cost a lot of money,” Neate said. We are putting in a fortune to make a teeny-weeny impact for the beneficiaries, when we should be bringing some of that power closer to our beneficiaries and looking at different ways of achieving change. Some of those policy changes we are seeing shore up the privilege of those organisations, but they might not have a big impact on people’s lives.”

Neate called for a conversation about how the sector could share power more equally and said some charities should give up their privilege to help the sector develop a common narrative that would convince people they should trust charities again. If we are going to think of ourselves as that third force, we are going to have to be more united,” she said.

“If civil society is going to realise its power as a third force, the big charity brands will have to make sacrifices. For people with privilege, it will hurt. Giving up privilege hurts. If it doesn’t, you are not doing it right. She said the sector was not “eyeballing each other” and talking about how it could share power. I really believe that the only way we as a sector can seize the moment is if organisations with power face their privilege and have the courage to address it.”

Source: https://www.thirdsector.co.uk/larger-charities-give-power-says-shelter-head/management/article/1447235

Harnessing Health in Older Age

Harnessing Health in Older Age

17 November 8.00am – 10.30am

JOIN US AT

Edge Hill University, Ormskirk

The Harnessing Health Network, in partnership with the Innovation Agency, is convening a discussion with leading thinkers to re-imagine our approach to healthy ageing across the North West. We want to work with you to co-create a new approach to action on healthy ageing, drawing together a short report to help shape the active and healthy ageing agenda.

We are delighted to confirm Debbie Sorkin National Director of Systems Leadership, Leadership Centre as our Chair for the event.

What is the Harnessing Health Network?

The Harnessing Health Network brings together talented, credible, motivated and flexible teams that work with clients to deliver sustainable improvements in health and wellbeing.

The Harnessing Health Network is values driven. We are passionate, positive and committed to maximising every opportunity to make a measurable difference to people’s lives, to changing the nature of prevention from reactive response towards a proactive sustainable approach across society.

Why attend?

As an influential leader you are invited to join this conversation. If you’re interested in questions such as “What would a health and social care system look like if it was genuinely co-created with older people?”  “How would this help us tackle the challenges of inequality and austerity?” please come along and have your say.

This event will be relevant to you if you have a senior decision making role in healthy ageing.
If you would like to attend, please register below.
Register
Copyright © 2017. Innovation Agency NWC. Academic Health Science Network. All rights reserved.

Our mailing address is: 
Innovation Agency, Vanguard House, Sci-Tech Daresbury, Keckwick Lane, Halton, WA4 4AB

Neuro Key Open Door series

Thanks to Jo Cole from Tees Valley, Durham and North Yorkshire Neurological Alliance for sending us copies of  two new publications, one on Acquired Brain Injury and the other on Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder.
Both will share a variety of case studies and learning outcomes.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/25686675/Neuro-Key_logo_small.jpg

Please contact Joanne Cole Head of Operations Neuro Key for more information

Tel;       01642 641825 Email;   jo.cole@na-tvdny.org.uk

Web;    www.na-tvdny.org.uk

Twitter; @NA-TVDNY

National Voices Person-centred care in 2017 research

New research conducted by National Voices, the coalition of over 160 health and care charities
in England, found that despite two decades of policy promises, NHS services still do not give
people adequate control of their own health and care. The report’s authors found that only 3%
of people with one or more long-term conditions had a written care plan, involvement in
decisions about care remains low, and there is currently no measure of whether care is
adequately coordinated.

https://www.nationalvoices.org.uk/publications/our-publications/person-centred-care-2017

 

Person-centred care in 2017 front cover

 

Waiting time standards for autism diagnosis

Waiting time standards for autism diagnosis

The House of Commons Library has published a debate pack on Waiting time standards for
autism diagnosis, which was sponsored by Bambos Charalambous MP. It provides background
information on waiting times for autism diagnoses in England, as well as Government policy on
autism in general, and diagnosis waiting times in particular.

file:///C:/Users/User/Downloads/CDP-2017-0158.pdf

 

 

Taking General Practice Forward

Primary Care Improvers Learning and Sharing Workshop – Taking General Practice Forward

On 21 November 2017 NHS England will be running a workshop for GPs, practice staff and those working
in and around Primary Care to come together and share stories. To attend, get your ticket here.

https://www.events.england.nhs.uk/events/8816/primary-care-improvers-learning-and-sharing-workshop-taking-general-practice-forward

Primary Care

Dementia Friends

We had a great meeting with Dr Penny Foulds at the University of Lancaster as part of the Lancashire Neuro Alliance.  Take a look at her website to discover more about the Dementia Cafes www.lancaster.ac.uk/defyingdementia

Dr Penny Foulds
Honorary Researcher
Division of Biomedical and Life Sciences
Faculty of Health and Medicine
University of Lancaster
 
Executive Healthcare Manager
MAC Clinical Research 
Faraday Way, Blackpool FY2 0JH
 
Mobile; 07923 487120